My Collection – Photos and Commentary

Varieties

United States Pencil Co.

United States Pencil Co., an American pencil company —

US Pencil Co Brands

USCO 486 varieties:

USCO 486

USCO Electro 486, a “transitional species” between USCO Grafine Lead 486 and USCO Electro 100:

USCO Transition

USCO Electro 100:USCO 100

Three different expressions for 2-1/2:

USCO 2.5

The only other place I’ve seen 2-5/10 is on Ticonderogas.

Nearly identical Evergreen copying pencils made in Czechoslovakia and in USA:

Czechoslovakia and US

An older ad showing that the Czech versions were actually made by L & C Hardtmuth:

Evegreen Copying Ad

I have seen an ad indicating that Our Drummer is also from U.S. Pencil Co. —

Drummer

Advertisements

Swan USA

Some of the major German pencil companies had subsidiaries in the United States.  The Swan Pencil Co., based in New York, was a subsidiary of Schwan.  Swan produced several brands —

Swan Brands

Othello and Fortuna are major Schwan brands.

Tiger 440 may be original to Swan —

Tiger

As evidenced by the wartime plastic and cardboard ferrules, Swan continued to produce and sell pencils during WWII.


General

General Pencil Company brands.  Others are in the Bowling and Red|Blue posts —

Kimberly 525 varieties:

Semi-Hex 498:

There’s a newer one with green lettering.  I typically don’t have new varieties.

These blue colored pencils all have numbers ending in 3:


Product Number Variation

Occasionally the product number associated with a particular brand of pencil will change with time, such as when Dixon’s Ticonderoga 1386 became 1388. Usually this change is accompanied by an update in design.  But here are a couple of pairs for which only the number is different:  

I suspect that for these, the product number printed on the pencil depended on the manner in which it was sold, for example individually or in a packaged set.


Beginners

Dixon Beginners 308 is another example of a brand that lasted many decades, over which time there were several variations but no major changes —

What’s up with the green one?  It looks like its competitor, the Venus Scribbler.


Lo-Well

Lo-Well was one of many pencil companies that were once headquartered in New York City.  Their main brand was Tech, varieties of which are shown here:

They also had an original series of pencils that appears to have been marketed for various professions –

I wonder how popular these were.  Did liquor store owners really prefer to use The Liquor Pencil?  Did priests covet The Clergyman’s Pencil?


Eagle Simplex

Eagle Pencil Company produced a wide variety of writing instruments.  One was an interesting mechanical pencil named Simplex.  It was cheap and came in several styles.

The Simplex has a patented, simple mechanism –

As the metal cylinder is screwed along the outside of the wooden body, a rod pushes the lead forward.

But there is also an older type of Simplex pencil that is completely different –

The lead is exposed by tearing off pieces of material around it.  This is similar to Blaisdell’s paper pencils, which were patented a year earlier (1895).


A. W. Faber Castell 9000 Varieties

Not 9000 varieties, but still a lot.  This famous brand began in 1905 and continues to this day.  These are from before 1993, when the A.W. was removed. 

Click for larger image

I have others too: without paint, variations of the back side, minor variations in lettering, and an anniversary edition.